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20130115
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
haven't followed the mayor wanted name, but if you look at labor, the environment playing out that way, a variety of social and cultural issues is always, importantly health care you mentioned is always the same coalition for certain stability there and a huge overlap and that's a terrific thing. >> is this interesting paper we see as part of the larger process of reallocation between state and federal government. how much leeway to see up on that administration have? i don't find very -- that would be fine if you had 2 million dvd agents is better than we do have, but how much room does the lord gave you? >> i think what all their shows as federalism is alive and well is the real of 60 kind of wandered the concepts in our country for obvious reasons, but even that term now is coming to be embraced by newer generation of something positive because you see controversial issues as you identified the address of the state level. that's a good thing happening here. it's easy when you're middle-aged man like me to brood about. the rule of law, what are we going to do? but we've had a lot of
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
environment? >> i will say the film most like the political environment nowadays, of all of the ones that came out whether they were nominated or not was paranormal 4. because it is weird and just keeps happening over and over again. >> jennifer: i think it totally is listen kohn because people put him on a pedestal that stuck to his guns. and he did stick to his guns but he had to roll up his sleeves and do some of the horse trading that had to be done to get the horse trade done. >> yes the issue was not black and white, and there were so many things behind the scenes someone willing to flog through the mud in order to have the ends justify the means, and always along the way tell some pretty hilarious stories. >> stephanie: yeah for sure. so what is the best film that you would recommending of all of these for political junkies? what had you on the edge of your seat? >> it's tough because of the films that were nominated this year, a lot of them we knew what happened in the end. lincoln, you know they end up passing the 14th amendment. we know -- if you read
need predictable and their regulatory environment. the federal government shouldn't pick the winners and losers, or subject energy projects to endless and duplicative views -- reduce. such roadblocks have stymied vital products, like the keystone pipeline, and that must be built. we shouldn't stop epa's -- we should -- shouldn't have said it that way. it's getting wound up a little bit. we should stop epa's senseless and ideologically driven battle to ban the production and the use of coal. and we should continue with the next generations of nuclear power plants, and we should waste no time in pursuing research that develop alternative sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, and deficiency. that is where we have led the world. by fully embracing america's energy opportunity, we can accelerate growth, create millions of new jobs, free ourselves from less than stable global suppliers and create huge new revenues for government, which will help reduce our budget deficit. we also have an extraordinary opportunity to create growth and jobs through expansion of trade and investment and to
enough people. and how do we get them in an environment in which nobody wants to serve and we have a hard time making national security decisions about what to do and make them honestly and intelligently. we've had a pretty lousy record of making intelligent decisions about national security in the last few years. >> i just think it's fascinating that we're now in a position where we need to be transitioning from being a military that is making all of its decisions about dwell time and how much time you got between deployments and who is going to deploy where and when to instead thinking about a mill they're is not at war, that needs to decide what its strength is going to be, its training requirements, its weapons systems are going to be. and the last time we did this really is after vietnam and we've got all these vietnam guys. >> you're absolutely right. if you talk to a guy like marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and you get him against the corner and we're inside the cone of silence and he'll tell you honestly what he believes, he will tell you that one of the majo
competitive environment from which to go out and compete around the world and win. host: one thing we heard leading up to discussions late last year is that some type of certainty was needed from decisions made. did the people you represent find the guest: certainty there is some of it. much is to be done because long- term overhang is still serious. nobody believes that our current spending course is sustainable. we have made promises that cannot be paid for. maybe not tomorrow or five years from now, but down the road changes need to be made. you're seeing this at the state level where governors and in both parties and legislative bodies are coming together. watch illinois right now, they are struggling with their pension debt, but at the national level we have not had the success yet that some of the states of had. host: looking at spending federally, what has to be guest::the first quarter this year is one that debate will take place. you have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertw
, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. take your camera and be prepared to
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
.s.s., perhaps should be funded by the space operations budget. we're in a challenging budget environment. fiscal realities demand that nasa become more efficient. consensus has to be established among agency stakeholders, and also to clarify nasa's strategic vision, goals, and mission. the good work that nasa has done and that nasa can do in the future is so very important to me, and to everyone here in this room. i want to preserve our international space station. it is not likely with this electorate than we can expect to go to mars until people can go to the grocery store. it is about the economy. the economy has to improve. i want to work together to insure the american people can get the kind of results that nasa is capable of producing. we have a distinguished panel of witnesses today. this should spark much-needed national dialogue about nasa's future. the group is uniquely qualified to start this important discussion by sharing their own perspective about the strategic direction of america's space program. that concludes my remarks. i now recognize mrs. johnson for her opening statement.
. they're trying to get a new stadium and they want public funding and this in tax environment, they say the only way to really enhance your value is to leverage this kind of victory if they won the super bowl to get a new stadium, and they're right on the cusp of it. they're having that conversation with it. and they're the only team left that haven't won it. and then you have ray lewis, who was, you know, charged with murder 12 years ago. >> right. >> and now he's like the beacon of respect in the nfl. >> it's -- for me it's hard to get past my preconceived notions. i don't think the ravens belong, i hate to say that, where, you know, i think they're going to have a hard time getting past new england. and i also think atlanta's going to have a hard time getting past san francisco, don't you? >> i think the san francisco, in many ways -- >> did you watch that? >> yeah. they are good. it's funny, they say colin kaepernick and rg three are transforming the game of football. at 180 plus yards rushing. how can you do that for ten years? >> and then i think new england's defense trying to st
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
environment as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states to 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving environmental performance of our product, our facilities, and operations. between 2000, and 2010 the amount of investment and technology to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined which were just slightly larger than our industry invest the. refinery invested have invested more than $127 billion since 1990 to produce cleaner fuels and meet the growing of variety of state and federal mandates. the complete transition to tier two gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tail pipe emissions by cars and light duty strucks, the -- trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. through increased efficiency, we are doing more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to produce a dollar of gdp than it did in 1970. america's oil and natural gas
in this current fiscal environment to ensure the success of the space launch? >> thank you, sir. that is a tall order. i think one of the crucial things the consolation program was supposed to do is to provide a smooth transition for the work force and for the capability the nation has off of the shuttle program to what ever came next. and we've lost that now. the deep integration between the low earth orbit and the destinations that was hoped for i think is also gone. i would first say 2012 is not 2008. we are in a different and new situation today and we have to look at going forward. the primary, one of the primary problems with the end of the constellation was again cutting ourselves off from our international partners who didn't see how they were going to participate increasing risks to the international space station because while we certainly hope for and encourage and want to see the private sector to go for that work if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complemen
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
cliff was a friendly family discussion compared to this hatfield/mccoy environment that's unfolding with regard to spending. >> so you think this whole story is going to have some real heart-stopping moments for the markets? >> i think there will be huge consequences. recall that in the summer of 2011 the last time we faced this that the dow went down 1800 points in july and august. now, granted there were some other issues in europe that were a concern. but we could see some serious consequences as a result of these -- this inability to have a discussion on spending cuts. >> i know you're a bond specialist, but apple reducing their iphone orders and so forth. apple fell 3.5% today. $18 to 501. is this apple reduction in ipad orders, is this symbolic of an economy that's getting weaker? >> well, i think so. i think -- well, we have heard some people say that, yes, it's part apple. the company. but also, i think it is symbolic of just people not having enough certainty of what kind of money they will have in the future to spend on items such as what apple offers. >> at the same time,
in that environment? >> uh-huh. >> rose: and went to oakland college. >> i went to owner land and owner land was my ideal college, i didn't get in on the first try and i got my only four-point to the gpa. >> rose: and went back to owner land. >> and check it out and promptly dropped by gpa by more points than i would like to share here. >> rose: when did you decide this is what i want to do? i want to act, i want to tell stories? >> i always -- i always loved -- i was always very h enamored of acting but didn't think it was a job i would be given. >> if that makes sense. >> rose: because? >> because even as a young girl i didn't think i would cast as the edge knew and not .. cast as the obese nanny and there were not -- it is funny and sounds like insane to say this about school plays but there weren't parts and i remember preparing so hard for an audition for alice in wonderland and being cast as a bouncing ball. >> rose: so once you had the time, though, to create things, did you immediately say there has to be a place for me? i will create a place maybe because i still want to act? >> well, yo
rate environment is very tough for them. you want to be cautious going into earnings. sandra: i told everybody you would be naming names. stock your portfolios with what you suggest here. you're calling for three of the 11 regional names to beat expectations. which three? >> well that would be mtb u.s. bank and fifth third and we think they are all in a position because of their mix of earnings, a lot of fee income because of merger in the case of mtb. those are ones where you could see them buck this trend of overall pressure on earnings. we think those are the places to be and they're high quality names. sandra: i want to tell everybody, m & t reporting this week on wednesday, fifth third is reporting on thursday. those are where you're calling for beats. six of them you are predicting of regional banks will miss expectations which six? >> we have a number of them. in fact it will be more than six. it will be across the board. we look at a keycorp and pnc, some of the other names where the net interest margin pressure because of a flat curve, much like wells fargo, even if they mak
employment opportunity, you've got income growth and environment of very low interest rate is headache to policymaker in which i think the government here continue to have to fine tunemakers every now and then essentially because after they tighten one time, they quiet down the market, but i comes back again because the liquidity flows remain strong. so whether this is the measures toned all measures remains to be seen, i think if the interest rate remains low, we may see further tightening after a period of quiet. i suppose contemplation, i think. >> stick right there. we also want to take a look at what is happening over in india. we're seeing mixed pictures on inflation. headline inflation slowed to its lowest level in three years, in fact. that was up about 7.2% from a year earlier and well shy of expectations. some say the lower than expected wpi fueled the rate cut from india. does this mean 25 basis point rate cuts and more to come? >> well, there's firm pressure from the politicians on the central bankers to do so. the growth is still rather iffy. you've got inflation taking th
interest level in this environment. you have to wonder if the bank isn't holding on to your loan to maintain that high level of interest. i wonder if the might be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstances to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all the bad loans that day made during the real estate mania. host: this idea of the debt to income ratio. that was something richard cordray talked-about. this is from american hero joe. explain this issue for us. guest: this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan. we do not want people taking on loans that they cannot afford to repay. 43% is the outside level. if your mortgage debt sure other debt -- car loans, credit cards -- exceed 43% of your growth or pre-tax income, then that is too much. that is a loan that is becoming too onerous and you might have trouble repaying. anything below 43% is acceptable as a qualified mortgage. anything above that starts to get into the territory of you are not having enough
that schools are structured environment and frankly, little girl's behavior, a willingness to sit still, pay attention, not necessarily to talk and get up and run around the room is more conducive to a classroom setting. what we've done, trying to turn little boys into different forms of little girls and a lot has to do with the way that schools are structured. you take a six-year-old and sit him in a chair and expect that they're going to stay there. it isn't natural, frankly, it isn't natural for a lot of little girls, it's more for the convenience of teachers than it is accommodating to the child's needs. >> that's truly right. little boys are savages, i don't mean that in-- it's just true. >> we can't change it, but thr he' lovable and grow up to warm, wonderful human beings when they get a little older. >> tucker: amen. on that hopeful note. coming up, get an instant mood boost from botox. true, that story coming up and women all around put it on every day, but one woman gave herself a no makeup challenge for a year, claims it made her more beautiful. is this a good lesson in vanity for
to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will
? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leadership [indiscernible] in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic as we look for
environment and we're willing to take what measures are necessary to make that happen. >> gretchen: the move is legal under the state's concealed carry law. >> steve: talk about a hero's welcome home. [ laughter ] >> steve: that's terrific. a very happy reunion between this army soldier and his dog after he spent a year in afghanistan. his dog, jasmine, didn't forget who he was and she can't contain her excitement. the video was posted to the armed forces site, welcome home blog.com and has been reposted all across the internet. that is absolutely beautiful. >> peter: terrific. >> steve: meanwhile, a tale of two temperatures. warm here in the northeast and a rare winter blast out west. our own maria molina has been tracking it all morning long, trying to explain why it's 50 degrees right now in new york city. >> yes. very strange. good morning. good morning, everybody. we actual lea is a big dip in the jet stream out west. that's really the reason why we're looking at all of that cold air across the western two-thirds of the country. that's allowing all of that cold air from canada to sink s
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)